Inking Done.

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As of Wednesday last week, all the pics for Single-Handed Fly Casting made it through the inking process. I have to digitize them in Photoshop and Illustrator, but that’s much more fun and relatively fast (inking is *not* the fun part).

In related news, I also got my final print quotes back from the press. The cost to print the book oblong (11 x 8.5) has really jumped in the last few years, so I’m going to do this one vertical (standard 8.5 x 11 sheet). I am quickly re-flowing the chapters to the new dimensions, and will soon start dropping in the pics and captions.

It looks like I can keep the book at $55USD plus shipping if I go vertical, so that’s the planned price going forward. I figure that’s reasonable for a text of this size and effort with only 1,001 copies.

I am hoping to have the actual pre-order email (that means $) ready to go this week or coming weekend, with links in place so that purchasing is easy no matter where one lives.

This project has only taken, oh, about 10 years longer than I had hoped, so it’s good to be in the home-stretch at last!

SHFC Update – June 12

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So, what’s up with Single-Handed Fly Casting? Good question!

I have two one chapters to finish inking and then I’m into the layout (the first three chapters are already totally done). Editing, cover, and such are all complete, so when I drop in the last image, and then let my computer build the table of contents and index, I have a book.

Once I finish inking, I will be sending out the email to turn pre-pre-orders into *actual* pre-orders. That means some $ will need to change hands, with the final book cost and shipping costs figured out. Still looking at the $50-$55 range for the book with shipping costs being location dependent. Current paper costs and such will dictate final book price, but I see it in the range just mentioned.

There will be 1,001 signed/numbered hardcovers, and there are still slots open on the reservation list. If there’s enough demand post-printing, I may do something else with the book, but for now I am looking at those 1,001 slots.

Inking!

Inking usually means quick (though appropriately accurate), with an eye on the important stuff and leaving out the fluff. My head is missing because I already have it drawn and can place it as needed. The rod is drawn as decor art straight from the video frames so only has certain reference points noted here. "X" means "remove this for sure").
Inking usually means quick (though appropriately accurate), with an eye on the important stuff and leaving out the fluff. My head is missing because I already have it drawn and can place it as needed. The rod is drawn as a vector illustration straight from the video frames so only has reference points noted here. “X” means “remove this for sure”). More clean up is done as these “roughs” are turned into full vector art.

So what’s the status of Single-Handed Fly Casting? INKING! That’s me with a laptop, a pen, and a pack of transparency film. At least the process is way faster than finding all the video frames on which the inking in based (that took about 10 full no-fun days). I ink, I scan, I clean-up, I vectorize, I finalize, I place, I caption. That’s the process until I read (one last time), and then I print (1,001 times). Then, I hope that my readers enjoy.

For those who have signed up for a copy of SHFC, I’ll likely send out the “please pay now” email when I am finalizing the “I finalize” part. The placing and captioning go fast, relatively speaking.

The Things You See…

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Working through dozens of HD video clips isolating images for my casting book. Came across this example of a tailing loop. Check out the rod flexure, line flow, and ultimate crossing problem in the final loop shape (this loop actually contacted the rod). While I enjoy beautiful casting as much as anyone, I also like casting this type of thing on video to see the carnage.

And in case anyone is wondering, no, I am not using actual photos like this for the book. I’d never do that (I consider these garbage as far as the overall visuals; far too much background noise). These are used solely for building illustrations, so I don’t really care about backgrounds, foregrounds, or anything else that’s pretty, ugly, or whatever. As long as I can see the rod and line, I’m good. I do have a killer location for shooting video. Maybe the place I’ll shoot a real casting video some day. It’s 2,000 miles from me right now, and I’d have to get clever with cameras (since I shoot myself), but it would be sweet….

UPDATE: A little tweaking to make the final tailing loop more obvious:

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Any Which Way

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So, I’ve been asked a number of times on facebook and elsewhere if my upcoming casting book focuses primarily on a vertical (overhead) casting stroke/style. No. I just haven’t posted pix of other stroke types yet. I cast with and fish with whatever gets the job done in the way I want to get it done. Here’s an except from the book that explains a bit of my approach to strokes/styles:

The vertically oriented Foundation Casting Stroke will be used to directly build the Overhead Cast. Then, the Foundation Casting Stroke will be angled (tipped to each side) to create various forms of the Side-Arm Cast, the Cross-Body Cast and the Across-The-Head Cast—all of which are casts made at orientations other than vertical. Following the various angled casts will be the Elliptical Cast, where the arm travels back and forth in distinctly different planes. Along with the changes/combinations of plane, the movements of casting will be both tightened and stretched out, with the casting arm traveling along both shorter and longer pathways.

In 2001–2002, I assisted Dr. Tim McCue with a survey on the incidence of fly-casting injury among casting instructors (subsequently published in the journal, “Wilderness & Environmental Medicine”). Out of that survey came a number of findings, including one showing that casters who utilized multiple casting styles (overhead, elliptical, sidearm, etc.), had the lowest overall pain incidence of any group.

So, by starting with the Foundation Casting Stroke, and then using that to create a collection of other strokes, you can hopefully build a highly effective, and lower stress casting environment that covers many angling needs.

SHFC – Image Layout Begins

jborger-shfc_8-9Into the image layout for “Single-Handed Fly Casting” now (and for the next few weeks). Illustrating each chapter first and then dropping everything in (and further editing text, too). Have a sample of a spread from Chapter One shown here. The illustrations you see are what you can expect throughout. Grayscale vectorized pics based directly on photographic frames (most shot at 60fps, some at 200fps and 240fps). This approach lets me isolate what needs to be seen without extra clutter, and also makes what you see quite accurate.

SHFC Update: Fix, Baby, Fix…

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Starting to get feedback on Single-Handed Fly Casting from outside readers. All of them are English-as-second-language speakers/writers. Their feedback is very helpful in cleaning up concepts and adjusting word usage. If they can’t understand what I’ve written, without the use of images, then I need to think hard about fixing things. In other words, my text has to make sense to people other than native “American-ese” speakers. That is especially key for this book, since the majority of pre-orders are currently from fly fishers residing outside the U.S.

It is my desire that the text is approachable by readers of all casting levels, with only minimal moments of “huh?” involved. SHFC is not “light reading,” that’s true,  but hopefully it won’t seem too heavy in how it goes about explaining the information.

SHFC Update – Proofing

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Single-Handed Fly Casting has been written, slashed to pieces, re-written, slashed and re-writtten some more, and then kind of edited. And now it’s out for some proofreading, which it desperately requires (I can barely stand to look at the text anymore, much less read it again while doing a fine-grained error check). A special thanks to Aitor, Grunde, and Lars for taking on the gruesome task.

I will make no apologies, SHFC is going to be a big honker of a book, with lots and lots of words between the pictures. I see it as the basis for the rest of the casting writing that I do from here on forward, so it needs to be built strong and deep. If you like detail and getting into what makes things tick, then SHFC is for you. If you want page after page of gorgeous photography without having to take a trip down a casting rabbit-hole, then SHFC isn’t for you. Just being straight-up.

It is my sincere hope that the 1,001 buyers of SHFC will find that their money has been well-spent on a text that can accompany them far into their own fly-casting journeys.

SHFC Update – Through Chapter 12 (and Pics)

jborger-shfc-cover-shot_1509So I’m done with the content edit of Chapter 12 (Other Casts and Skills, technically the last chapter). I am now into Chapter 11, which is the D-Loop Group. It is long enough to be a small, stand-alone book. This is the last chapter that I have to edit before the book goes out to a few other people to read. Red pens, here we go …

Also starting up the pics. Doing a bit of old school and a bit of new school there, with hand-drawn images being scanned and output as fully scalable vector art. Gives me infinite sizing leeway going forward.

 

SHFC Update – Chapter 9 Edited (Check the Page Count)

Single-Handed Fly Casting is getting closer to an editing finish, with Chapter 9 (Hauling) now wrapped up. The page count has plummeted during my edits, as well. Was 252 when I started. Not any more. We’ll see what it’s at when I get through Chapter 12. Then in go the pics, and that will expand things in a big way. Aiming to be 360 pages or less when finished.

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