SHFC Update – June 12

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So, what’s up with Single-Handed Fly Casting? Good question!

I have two one chapters to finish inking and then I’m into the layout (the first three chapters are already totally done). Editing, cover, and such are all complete, so when I drop in the last image, and then let my computer build the table of contents and index, I have a book.

Once I finish inking, I will be sending out the email to turn pre-pre-orders into *actual* pre-orders. That means some $ will need to change hands, with the final book cost and shipping costs figured out. Still looking at the $50-$55 range for the book with shipping costs being location dependent. Current paper costs and such will dictate final book price, but I see it in the range just mentioned.

There will be 1,001 signed/numbered hardcovers, and there are still slots open on the reservation list. If there’s enough demand post-printing, I may do something else with the book, but for now I am looking at those 1,001 slots.

Jelly Water Puzzle

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From the latest of my weekly front page entries over at Sexyloops.com.

Years ago, I was fishing a small Montana spring creek regarded for its tricky drag/presentation situations and touchy trout. I had located a big fish feeding near the bank on a gentle bend in the creek. A mayfly hatch had the trout rising, pushing a small wake every time it surfaced. Having spooked a rather large rainbow earlier in the day with an approach that was too close, I decided to hang back, and drop a long Puddle Cast up-and-across to the fish.

Several casts, mends and drifts later, the fish was still rising, but not to my fly.

Read the rest of the story here.

Going Big for Small

jborger_15-inch-bow2From my latest front page over at sexyloops.com:

One summer, my wife, Kelley, and I devoted a few days to fishing some of less-pressured stretches of Montana’s famed Gallatin River. While the public access points were stacked with Bozeman and Big Sky traffic, a bit of walking and wading often found us a quiet place on the river. One of those places still held the remnants of a modest channel. Its flows were slowed to a crawl by the summer sun, and its thread-bare riffles babbled softly into two deep pools.

Read the rest of the story here.

 

Inking!

Inking usually means quick (though appropriately accurate), with an eye on the important stuff and leaving out the fluff. My head is missing because I already have it drawn and can place it as needed. The rod is drawn as decor art straight from the video frames so only has certain reference points noted here. "X" means "remove this for sure").
Inking usually means quick (though appropriately accurate), with an eye on the important stuff and leaving out the fluff. My head is missing because I already have it drawn and can place it as needed. The rod is drawn as a vector illustration straight from the video frames so only has reference points noted here. “X” means “remove this for sure”). More clean up is done as these “roughs” are turned into full vector art.

So what’s the status of Single-Handed Fly Casting? INKING! That’s me with a laptop, a pen, and a pack of transparency film. At least the process is way faster than finding all the video frames on which the inking in based (that took about 10 full no-fun days). I ink, I scan, I clean-up, I vectorize, I finalize, I place, I caption. That’s the process until I read (one last time), and then I print (1,001 times). Then, I hope that my readers enjoy.

For those who have signed up for a copy of SHFC, I’ll likely send out the “please pay now” email when I am finalizing the “I finalize” part. The placing and captioning go fast, relatively speaking.

A Healthier Cast

Getting set up wth motion-capture markers and EMG leads. Dr. Tim McCue on the left, Dr. Michael Hahn on the right. It didn't hurt until the sticky bits had to come off.
Getting set up wth motion-capture markers and EMG leads. Dr. Tim McCue on the left, Tyler Brown behind my hand, Dr. Michael Hahn on the right. It didn’t hurt until the sticky bits had to come off.

My front page over at sexyloops.com today starts this way:

“Fly casting is the physical skill of fly fishing.”

I grew up with that mantra playing through my head. Certainly there are other “physical” aspects of fly fishing, but it is in casting where the serious hand-eye coordination and use of the physical body come into the most play. Pain or injury—whether preexisting or caused by casting—can impact the game significantly.

The page deals with a healthier cast–not the rod and line mechanics, but the human side. I’ve been involved in caster health since 2002, when I met Dr. Tim McCue and was involved in his survey of pain incidence among casting instructors. We’ve since gone on to do much more through the Fly Casting Institute, including working with friends and colleagues who were preparing biomechanics papers. While one can only say so much in a short article, you can check out the complete read here:

http://www.sexyloops.com/index.php/ps/a-healthier-cast

The Things You See…

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Working through dozens of HD video clips isolating images for my casting book. Came across this example of a tailing loop. Check out the rod flexure, line flow, and ultimate crossing problem in the final loop shape (this loop actually contacted the rod). While I enjoy beautiful casting as much as anyone, I also like casting this type of thing on video to see the carnage.

And in case anyone is wondering, no, I am not using actual photos like this for the book. I’d never do that (I consider these garbage as far as the overall visuals; far too much background noise). These are used solely for building illustrations, so I don’t really care about backgrounds, foregrounds, or anything else that’s pretty, ugly, or whatever. As long as I can see the rod and line, I’m good. I do have a killer location for shooting video. Maybe the place I’ll shoot a real casting video some day. It’s 2,000 miles from me right now, and I’d have to get clever with cameras (since I shoot myself), but it would be sweet….

UPDATE: A little tweaking to make the final tailing loop more obvious:

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Any Which Way

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So, I’ve been asked a number of times on facebook and elsewhere if my upcoming casting book focuses primarily on a vertical (overhead) casting stroke/style. No. I just haven’t posted pix of other stroke types yet. I cast with and fish with whatever gets the job done in the way I want to get it done. Here’s an except from the book that explains a bit of my approach to strokes/styles:

The vertically oriented Foundation Casting Stroke will be used to directly build the Overhead Cast. Then, the Foundation Casting Stroke will be angled (tipped to each side) to create various forms of the Side-Arm Cast, the Cross-Body Cast and the Across-The-Head Cast—all of which are casts made at orientations other than vertical. Following the various angled casts will be the Elliptical Cast, where the arm travels back and forth in distinctly different planes. Along with the changes/combinations of plane, the movements of casting will be both tightened and stretched out, with the casting arm traveling along both shorter and longer pathways.

In 2001–2002, I assisted Dr. Tim McCue with a survey on the incidence of fly-casting injury among casting instructors (subsequently published in the journal, “Wilderness & Environmental Medicine”). Out of that survey came a number of findings, including one showing that casters who utilized multiple casting styles (overhead, elliptical, sidearm, etc.), had the lowest overall pain incidence of any group.

So, by starting with the Foundation Casting Stroke, and then using that to create a collection of other strokes, you can hopefully build a highly effective, and lower stress casting environment that covers many angling needs.

In Search of the Perfect Loop

I mention a lot of friends and fellow casters/instructors in Single-Handed Fly Casting. One of those friends is Christopher Rownes. I’ve known Christopher for years, and always enjoy watching his casting videos (they aren’t as much about instruction as about enjoying casting for its flow and beauty). If you are an instructor or caster who loves the flow, check out a little of Chris’s work here:

On “The Board”

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Hanging out with my old pal, Paul Arden, at his sexyloops.com casting/fishing Board for a week starting tomorrow (Monday the 18th). Stop by and chat if you get the chance. The Board at SL has been a hotbed of fly casting (and fishing) discussion for many years, with some serious “nuts and bolts” stuff going on regularly (poorly supported fly-casting dogma and pre-conceived notions don’t tend to last long there).